CRIME & DRUGS

I believe that there are far too many folks in our prison system for committing so-called “victim-less” crimes. Such criminals should be rehabilitated instead of punished. When a convicted criminal serves their sentence and is released from the prison system, they should be able to re-enter into society and try to acclimate. California wastes more money trying to execute a convicted criminal than it does imprisoning them for the rest of a convicted criminal’s life, without the possibility of parole. We have spent over $1 trillion dollars since the inception of the DEA, fighting an un-winnable war on drugs. California and a few other states have legalized the medicinal use of Marijuana. Such state rights should be protected by our Federal Government, not opposed. In fact, studies have shown that much of our deficit can be paid for, if marijuana is legalized and taxed. I support this position.

My opponent, Walters, supported NO on expanding services for offenders' re-entry into society (Second Chance Act; Bill HR1593). Rep. CONYERS: “Some 650,000 men and women are leaving the federal and state prisons each year. While the vast majority of the prisoners are committed to abiding by the law and becoming productive members of society, they often encounter the same pressures and temptations that they faced before prison. More than two-thirds of them are arrested for new crimes within 3 years of their release. This exacts a terrible cost in financial terms as well as in human terms. The Second Chance Act will help provide these men and women with the training, counseling and other support needed to help them obtain and hold steady jobs; to kick their drug and alcohol habits; rebuild their families; and deal with the many other challenges that they face in their efforts to successfully rejoin society.” Walters supported NO on funding for alternative sentencing instead of more prisons (Amendment sponsored by Scott, D-VA; Bill HR 4690). She supported no to an amendment that would reduce the funding for violent offender imprisonment by and truth-in-sentencing programs by $61 million. The measure would increase funding for Boys and Girls Clubs and drug courts by the same amount. Walters supported YES on more prosecution and sentencing for juvenile crime (Bill introduced by McCollum, R-FL; Bill HR 1501). This bill appropriates $1.5 billion to all of the states that want to improve their juvenile justice operations. Among other provisions this bill includes funding for development, implementation, and administration of graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders, funds for building, expanding, or renovating juvenile corrections facilities, hiring juvenile judges, probation officers, and additional prosecutors for juvenile cases. Walters is once again out of touch with WE the People.

Walters’ Voting/Support Record:

  • NO on expanding services for offenders' re-entry into society (Second Chance Act; Bill HR1593)
  • NO on funding for alternative sentencing instead of more prisons (Amendment sponsored by Scott, D-VA; Bill HR 4690)
  • YES on more prosecution and sentencing for juvenile crime (Bill introduced by McCollum, R-FL; Bill HR 1501)
  • NOT standing up for WE the People

Varasteh’s Congressional Pledge:

  • “Victim-less” criminals rehabilitated not incarcerated
  • DNA testing prior to any execution
  • Marijuana & hemp legalization and taxation
  • Standing up for WE the People
  • Not for sale